Worry, Anxiety, Fear? Keep Calm and Carry On – Interview with Dr. Mark A. Reinecke, Ph.D.

Do you worry a lot? Do you find yourself experiencing increasing anxiety? Are you fearful? Do you have negative worry thoughts that create anxiety and fear in your life? Please join Life Coach, A.J. Mahari, on Monday October 25th, at 7pm EST, for an interview with Dr. Mark A. Reinecke, Ph.D., author of the book, “Little Ways to Keep Calm and Carry On – Twenty Lessons for Managing Worry, Anxiety, and Fear” on the Psyche Whisperer Radio Show

This interview is now available in our archives on blogtalkradio.com and you can listen to it right here on this page now.

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Dr. Reinecke, author of “Litte Ways To Keep Calm and Carry On – Twenty Lessons for Managing worry, anxiety, and Fear” is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Chief of the Division of Psychology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. His research and clinical interests center on understanding and treating depression and suicide among children and adolescents. He is widely published, and has authored or edited eight books including Cognitive Therapy Across the Lifespan, Comparative Treatments of Depression, Cognitive Therapy with Children and Adolescents, Personality Disorders in Children and Adolescents. 

Dr. Mark Reinecke is a clinical psychologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. His clinical interests include cognitive-behavioral therapy, as well as anxiety, panic and obsessive-compulsive disorders. Dr. Reinecke earned his doctorate from Purdue University, and he is board-certified in clinical psychology.

He is a distinguished fellow and past president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a diplomat of the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. He lives in Chicago, IL.

  

This is a very useful, practical, and non-stigmatizing helpful book about keeping calm versus being in a state of anxiety, worry, and/or fear. The lesson in this book and how they are conveyed in layman’s terms not only normalize the experience of anxiety, worry, and fear, but also give you understandable information about how you can change your way of thinking and your way or perceiving and experiencing your thoughts and life so that you can “Keep Calm and Carry On”. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to more effectively manage the challenges of worry, anxiety, and/or fear. We live in stressful times and worry is increasingly becoming a part of everyday life but it doesn’t have to be as Dr. Mark A Reinecke points out in this book that delivers much-needed information in a way that won’t overwhelm you. – Life and Mental Health Coach,  A.J. Mahari

 

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

About the title

Introduction

Lesson 1 Anxiety: It Works

Lesson 2 The Big “A”

Lesson 3 We Overestimate Risk When We’re Afraid

Lesson 4 The Future Is Uncertain

Lesson 5 Influence and Control

Lesson 6 You Have the Power to Control Your Anxiety

Lesson 7 Perfect Solutions Don’t Exist

Lesson 8 Sometimes You Can Take Control of Bad Situations—but Sometimes Not

Lesson 9 Recurring, Intrusive Thoughts Are Normal; It’s the Meaning We Attach to Them That Counts

Lesson 10 Dwelling on Problems Impairs Your Ability to Cope

Lesson 11 Worrying Is Highly Overrated

Lesson 12 Don’t Magnify the Importance of Your Physical Sensations

Lesson 13 It’s Time to Relax

Lesson 14 Evaluate Your Thoughts and Make Them Account for Themselves

Lesson 15 Changing Your Thoughts

Lesson 16 When You’re Worried or Anxious, Avoiding Problems Is Among the Worst Things You Can Do

Lesson 17 Social Anxiety: Worrying Too Much About What Others Think

Lesson 18 What’s Really on Your Mind?

Lesson 19 Flow with the Current of Life

Lesson 20 Live Wisely

Epilogue: A Final Note

Resources for Readers

References

 

Introduction

Worrying is a national epidemic, so if you feel anxious and uncertain, you’re not alone. But there’s good news! Thanks to researchers and clinicians, this subject is well understood. Here it is: a quick, compact read that tells you what you need to know to understand anxiety and deal with it constructively. This little book presents the most important findings from empirical research in cognitive behavioral therapy and affective neuroscience in a concise way that’s easy to grasp. It tells you what you need to know and do. Based on recent work in empirically supported anxiety treatments, this easy-to-read guide will help you deal with an emotion that can completely unravel your day. 

Think of this book as a tool that teaches you how to filter your thoughts in ways that will change both how you feel and how you behave. Despite the simplicity of the techniques, they produce powerful results. 

Read each lesson in sequence. Some will resonate with you more than others, but each lesson allows you to build your own customized “anxiety management toolbox.” 

As you read this book, consider taking some time to write your thoughts. Put pen to paper and note how you might apply the various lessons in your life. This is your own personal journey—an opportunity to learn to think, feel, and behave differently. You might think of your notes as a personal journal or a private blog. Keeping a journal is entirely optional, but writing notes and reflecting on new information will not only aid your retention but also help you organize the material in your mind and integrate it with your existing knowledge. It may make for a richer and more useful experience, and it should only take a few minutes. Give it a try. 

Many of the lessons conclude with recommendations for action, under the headings “Now Ask Yourself…” and “What You Need to Do.” For these activities, you’ll need a notebook or at least a few blank sheets of paper. Though brief, these exercises can be quite powerful. Applying daily what you’ve learned can accelerate the process, increasing your likelihood of making progress and maintaining your gains. These are the tools that will help you master your worry, anxiety, and fear. Clinicians often refer to them as “homework,” but this isn’t homework in the academic sense. Rather, it’s the notion that though insight alone—what we learn—may not bring about changes in emotions or behavior, we can introduce change by acting on our knowledge and insight. You’ll want to apply this insight in your day-to-day life, and these exercises are an opportunity to do just that. 

Know this: these approaches work. I’ve seen them work with my clients. More importantly, dozens of controlled studies completed at clinics and research centers around the world support the approaches described in this book. The result? Using them can help you have a better day—one where you are more productive, have a greater sense of control, and manage whatever life throws your way by using solutions rather than letting worry take your brain hostage. A small book is no substitute for professional care, of course. If you are experiencing more severe anxiety, or thoughts of death or suicide, you’ll want to work with an experienced mental health specialist; you’ll find Internet resources at the end of the book. 

Don’t underestimate the power of worry, anxiety, and fear. When appropriate, they can play a positive, even essential, role in your life. However, they can also be disruptive and disabling. The bottom line is that you don’t have to be a victim of these unpleasant emotions. You can control how you live your day and what role anxiety plays, and this little guide will show you how. 

Let’s get on with it.” 

Source: New Harbinger Publications Inc.

 

 


“He’s a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University and an expert on anxiety. He’s managed to put all of his expertise into a cute, handy little guidebook for everyday life. Who doesn’t need a little extra help to keep calm in these stress-filled times?

 

‘No worries.’ It’s the new catch phrase. 

As if. 

Everybody worries. It doesn’t mean you need a shrink. But every once in awhile, when the stress level gets a bit too high, you might wish you had a little coach sitting on your shoulder to give you some tips on how to calm yourself down.” 

Source: Just The Bookstore 


 

“First featured on a British poster produced during World War II, ‘Keep calm and carry on’ has become the mantra of millions—but exactly how to keep calm remains a difficult question for most of us. 

The next time you are stressed by pressures at work, overwhelmed by life’s challenges, or panicked by problems that seem unsolvable, reach for this book. In Little Ways to Keep Calm and Carry On, you’ll find twenty short yet powerful lessons and anxiety-reducing techniques that will help you move past stressful moments with grace. Each lesson is so simple to learn and practice, you’ll find that this pocket guide is all you really need whenever you need a little help keeping calm. 

A gem of a resource for anyone who struggles with anxiety or worry.”

<—Denise D. Davis, Ph.D., clinical psychologist and assistant director of clinical training at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN – from the New Harbinger Publications Inc. 

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